Busy Busy

busy

I swear, as you get older, time flies a lot faster than it seemed 20 years ago.

Seriously. In my 20s, it seemed like life was a bit slower and I had time for anything put on my plate. Now, I barely blink, and it seems like the days go by way too fast, let alone the past 4 months.

Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s…you name it. And here we are, less than a month away from Easter and then summer.

Nothing exciting has happened, really. A few bouts of Covid and ear infections with the kids, but that’s life these days.

Busy as ever.

The Life and Death of Geauga Lake Amusement Park →

Abandoned Geauga Lake

Do you have time for a tale? Sit back, relax, and dive into the interesting and timeless case of Geauga Lake, a tiny family park that started humbly enough, before rocketing overnight into international headlines by combining with a full-sized SeaWorld to create the world’s largest Six Flags.

A gargantuan park of mega-coasters, killer whales, dizzying flat rides, a Batman water ski show, dolphins, log flumes, Hurricane Harbor, and motion simulators for one price, Six Flags Worlds of Adventure was conceptually prepared to become the best theme park on Earth.

Theme Park Tourist

I’ll admit: I visited Sea World with my family in the early 90s as a pre-teen, and so I don’t recall much about Geauga Lake. However, I was aware of Six Flags Worlds of Adventure while in college but never visited. I didn’t realize that it was the world’s largest amusement park for a short time. Even worse, I’m ashamed to admit that even as an Ohio citizen, I never knew it closed down over 12 years ago until reading this article.

Sit back, grab a drink, and read the incredible history of Geauga Lake Amusement Park.

Ned Skeldon Stadium

Once a racetrack for the Lucas County fairgrounds, Ned Skeldon Stadium originally opened as Lucas County Stadium to bring the Mud Hens baseball team back to life.

For 37 seasons (1965 – 2001), Ned Skeldon Stadium was home of the Toledo Mud Hens minor league baseball team, based in Maumee, Ohio. The Mud Hens are part of the International League and are affiliated with the Detroit Tigers.

The stadium capacity is listed at just over 10,000 fans, though I don’t recall a game I attended having even half that for attendance. Regardless, it was replaced in 2002 with Fifth Third Field in downtown Toledo.

I recently took a trip to the old stadium to see if it was still standing, and was pleasantly surprised that not only is it still around, it’s being used as a rec center. While I was unable to get inside the stadium to take some closer pics, I did walk away with a few shots of what remains of the stadium itself.

I’m thankful that the stadium wasn’t demolished before I could get some pics. Simply standing outside of the field brought back memories of watching games here.

I grew up watching minor league baseball, starting with the Kinston Indians, so there will always be a part of me that enjoys small stadiums such as this.

20 Years of Aqua →

Screenshot from an early preview build. Yes, the Apple menu was removed from the left and was placed in the center. Thankfully, that changed. But still…

From Stephen Hackett:

At Macworld 2000, Steve Jobs unveiled the user interface for Mac OS X. It was called Aqua.
512 Pixels

Has it really been that long since Steve Jobs demoed Aqua to the world? Seriously, I was just 19 when this was announced and a freshman in college. I still remember the keynote to this day and I could not wait to try out the new interface; hell, my computer was supposed to support it so I was definitely excited.

Damn, time flies by too fast. Now, get the hell off my lawn.